Blog

Race of Remembrance 2017

The 2017 Race of Remembrance event (#RoR2017) takes place over the weekend of the 10-12th November on the #Tracmon #Anglesey circuit and is hosted by Mission Motorsport

This page has images from the event which are freely available to anyone who wishes to keep a memory of the event or make a print. The on-line images are sized and optimised for use on social media (right click the image and select save image as..), if they are used I would ask that a credit be given.

There are many images (over 1000 !) from the Race of Remembrance weekend so grab a coffee, or three, and get comfy 🙂 #RoR2017.

If you would like a print file then please e-mail me at kevin@photosbykev.com quoting the number of the image(s) and I will send you the image files that you can print locally. No catch, no charge, just my way of supporting the event. If you wish to give a small donation to support Help for Heroes then please use Mission Motorsport.


Friday 10th – practise sessions (440 images)


Saturday 11th – morning qualifying sessions (249 images)


Saturday 11th – Super cars (216 images)


Saturday 11th and Sunday 12th – The Endurance race (168 images)

Drift Matsuri 2017

The 2017 Drift Matsuri event (#Driftmatsuri2017) took place over the weekend of the 28-29th October on the #Tracmon #Anglesey circuit. All of these images were taken on Sunday the 29th.

This page has images from the event which are freely available to anyone who wishes to keep a memory of the event or make a print. The on-line images are sized and optimised for use on social media (right click the image and select save image as..), if they are used I would ask that a credit be given.

There will be over 340 images so grab a coffee and get comfy 🙂 #Driftmatsuri2017 #Driftmatsuri.

If you would like a print file then please e-mail me at kevin@photosbykev.com quoting the number of the image(s) and I will send you the image files that you can print locally. No catch, no charge, just my way of supporting the event but if you wish to donate something to the Wales Air Ambulance then please feel free to do so.

Pistyll Rhaeadr Waterfall

At 240ft Pistyll Rhaeadr waterfall is the highest waterfall in England or Wales.

Referred to as “The Hidden Pearl of Wales” this waterfall provides a magnificent backdrop to one of the most beautiful and serene valleys I’ve had the pleasure of photographing.

Full of surprises with a wide variety of wildlife and birds that can be seen from the comfort of the friendly restaurant/tearoom conveniently found at the bottom of the Pistyll Rhaeadr waterfall.

The folklore and legends of the Pistyll Rhaeadr waterfall can be read on the main website located here.

 

Parys Mountain VR Tour

The Parys mountain on Anglesey contains the Mona and Parys copper mines. The copper was first extracted in the Bronze age to make crude but effective tools. Over the centuries the mines have been worked until the 1900’s.

A detailed history of the mine workings can be found on the Parys Underground Group website and visitors to the island can see some of the history and artifacts at the Copper Kingdom centre run by the Amlwch Industrial Heritage Trust in the Amlwch port.

The virtual tour has been created using a Canon 5D3 camera and Samyang 14mm lens mounted on a panoramic head. Each panorama contains 17 HDR images created from 51 raw exposures taken @ -2, 0 and +2 stops and stitched in Autopano Giga software. The underground panoramas were lit with a single Canon 600RT flashgun.

Hint: if you want to go straight to the underground tours look at your feet on the VR tour above

Perseid meteors

A selection of Perseid meteors captured mainly on Anglesey using DSLR cameras and a mixture of stills and timelapse.

It is worth remembering that photographing meteors is not the same as photographing the stars, different techniques are required. Stars are effectively stationary for the duration of an exposure whereas meteors will move through the field of view of your lens in a second or so. Meteors maybe bright but they are also very very quick so the time each photosite in your camera sensor has to grab photons is very short so you have to maximise the light gathering with iso and aperture. The shutter speed is almost irrelevant other than to set the ambient exposure level.

So:

  • for star field photography the priority order is shutter, remembering the 500 rule to avoid star trails, aperture and finally iso to set the ambient light level to avoid clipping the black level.
  • for meteor photography the priority order is aperture wide open and use a fast lens, iso, as high as possible and finally shutter to set the ambient light level.

I always try to expose to the right of the histogram and use iso6400, the noise this iso level creates can be handled in post processing if you avoid underexposure.

Drift Matsuri 2016

The 2016 Drift Matsuri event (#Driftmatsuri2016) took place over the weekend of the 29-30th October on the Anglesey circuit.

This page has images from the event which are freely available to anyone who wishes to keep a memory of the event or make a print. There are over 300 images so grab a coffee and get comfy 🙂 #Driftmatsuri2016 #Driftmatsuri

If you would like a print file then please e-mail me at kevin@photosbykev.com quoting the number of the image(s) and I will send you the image files that you can print locally. No catch, no charge, just my way of supporting the event but if you wish to donate something to the Wales Air Ambulance then please feel free to do so.

Noctilucent Clouds

Just when you thought you could put the cameras away after chasing the Northern lights through the winter the season for hunting the Noctilucent clouds is almost upon us again. This page will be updated as and when I manage to capture some NLC images for this year.

Noctilucent clouds or NLCs are the jewels in the twilight summer skies, they are also called Polar Mesospheric Clouds or PMCs. For a month or so before and after the Summer Solstice, which is June 20th in 2016, they can shine and dance brightly in the rich blue background of the twilight and dawn skies.

It is only during this short period that the very high Noctilucent clouds can form just below the mesospause layer of the atmosphere approximately 80-85km above us. They require temperatures below -123c which only occur at these high altitudes around the summer solstice period and are created from microscopic particles surrounded by ice crystals which scatter the sunlight. This website provides details of the daily temperatures in the mesopause layer which might aid in forecasting the appearance of the NLCs.

Because of their very high altitude they are the only clouds illuminated by the sun when it is at least 6 degrees below the horizon (approximately 40 minutes after sunset or before sunrise). When the sun reaches 16 degrees below the horizon (about 2 1/2 hours after sunset or before sunrise) the clouds will not be illuminated and they disappear into the night sky waiting to be reborn by the predawn light of sunrise.

They are commonly confused with high white Cirrus cloud which is still illuminated by the sun shortly after sunset or before sunrise or by the moon against a dark sky, but on a moonless night with the sun more than 6 degrees below the horizon you are probably seeing the white or bluish white NLCs.

To view the NLCs you need nothing other than patience, clear skies with little or no light pollution, the right atmospheric conditions and a clear view to the northern horizon. They appear in the Northwest to Northeast direction above the sun’s position below the horizon. Before midnight they are in the Northwest and as the night progresses drift further to the North and Northeast.

To photograph the Noctilucent clouds I would recommend a decent DSLR but a good bridge camera can also capture them. Fast wide angle lenses, with an aperture of f/2.8, will allow you to use a relatively fast shutter speed of around 10-15 seconds. Longer exposures will tend to blur the fine detail in the clouds as they move across the sky. If you use telephoto lenses to capture the very fine detail in the clouds then the exposure times will need to be reduced to a few seconds to avoid motion blur spoiling your photographs.

A tripod, or a good solid wall, is essential to support the camera during the long exposures and a remote intervalometer is ideal to minimise any camera movement. Manually focusing on a star and then turning off the autofocus function will ensure the lens remains focused on the clouds rather than hunting for the correct focus point and manual exposure, or exposure compensation, is necessary  to avoid overexposing the surprising bright NLCs.

Some beautiful still photographs can be taken and if you have the time then taking a lot of images for a timelapse can be very rewarding as you will see the structure of the Noctilucent clouds change as they flow and ebb across the night sky.

If you are very lucky you might catch the NLCs and the Northern lights in the same evening. The timelapse below was captured on the 23rd of June 2015 and shows the Northern lights and Noctilucent clouds from Cemlyn bay on Anglesey.

For more information and scientific details of NLCs I would recommend visiting the Atmospheric Optics and NLCNet websites and the website of the NightSkyHunter for a fascinating insight into the classification of the NLC structures. Spaceweather.com also get some beautiful NLC images when the season kicks off.

The countdown has begun for the new season. Good luck and good hunting !

Bat Echolocation calls

A collection of bat echo location calls made by bats on Anglesey captured with a Batbox Duet  bat detector and Tascam DR-05 digital recorder. All of the bat echo location recordings are 16-bit 44.1Khz stereo wav files with the left channel recording the FD (Frequency Division) audio and right channel the heterodyne audio output.

If you have any idea what bat species have been recorded please let me know 🙂

The images below are the bat echo location sonograms created by the BatScan software and the full sized image can be downloaded by right clicking on the image and selecting ‘save link as …’

To listen to, and download, the audio wav file just left click on the partial sonogram image this will open a larger sonogram image and the audio file is shown under the larger image.

26th July 2017 – Llanfairynghornwy, Anglesey, UK